All the Lingo | Explaining Gamer Lingo So You Can Understand Your Friends

So you’re new to the world of games and you have no idea what the flip anyone is saying? Join the club. Like any other group, gamers have their own language – whether it’s used to abbreviate and save time, indicate that you’ve been playing for a long time or to (let’s be honest here guys) haze the noob (someone who is new to gaming – see we’re already learning!). 

 

Even more fun – slash confusing – is that while there’s a lot of overlap, different kinds of gamers have different lingo. RPGs, board games, and videogames have a lot in common and are often played by the same people, but there are situations, scenarios, and therefore lingo, that are unique to each subset of gaming. 

 

So whether you’re an aspiring gamer or a parent who just wants to “get it” – let’s get started on our flash tutorial of all things gamer lingo!

Genres of Game

Okay, so we all know there are about a billion games in the world that come in all shapes and sizes. But what do we call them so we don’t look dumb in front of our new friends?? Glad you asked! (Please note that we are leaving out genres like “sports” and “adventure” because they are painfully literal and obvious and do not count as lingo.)

3PS / TPS / OTS

Third-Person Shooter / Over the Shoulder. These games are designed to make it feel like you’re controlling a character that’s, well… not you! Games like Gears of War, The Division, Witcher, and Mass Effect are all examples.

4X

The “X” in 4X stands for: eXplore, eXpand, eXploit, and eXterminate (We know what you’re thinking – why not 4E?? Not as cool would be our guess).  4X games are a subgenre of strategy game that has all four “X” components – basically, they’re empire building games. Examples include the Dominions games, Pandora: First Contact, and Empire: Total War. 

 

CCG

Stands for Collectible Card Game. Pretty much what is sounds like. Examples: Hearthstone and Magic the Gathering.

FPS

First Person Shooter. This is a lot like a third-person shooter, but…not. Instead of controlling a character you can see on the screen, you are the character. You know, those games where the screen shows just hands with a gun and you control the camera to look around like a person would. Battlefield, Call of Duty, Halo, and CounterStrike are all First Person Shooters.\

MMO

Massively Multiplayer Online. So here’s where we dig a little deeper. MMO is a general term that covers a lot of online games with large player bases. Since they’re online, anyone in the world can play and interact with all other people playing the game. So MMOs can be FPS, RPG (see below), TPS, whatever. 

 

So an MMO can be an RPG but not all RPGs are MMOs. Confused yet? 

 

The best-known example? World of Warcraft. We know you’ve heard of that. You have heard of WoW right (meta acronym bonus!). If you haven’t, please look it up and then return to nerd camp because people will laugh in a mean way and we don’t want that for you. 

MOBA

Multiplayer Online Battle Arena. This is a more recent genre where you control a single hero in a team-based game. So you’re playing with other people on a team against other teams of people! League of Legends is a famous example. 

RPG

Role-Playing Game. RPGs are games that allow you to build a character and then play their every decision. Want to become a wizard and eat only turnips? Excellent choice – you can do that! There are variations of course, with varying levels of freedom, but basically RPGs are open worlds that you get to play in like giant sandboxes. (Hence the synonymous terms “sandbox game” or “open world game”.) 

 

Skyrim and Fallout 4 are good examples in video games. DnD and Pathfinders are tabletop examples – many consider these the “original” or “pure” RPGs. 

RTS

Real-Time Strategy. This is very literal – players play a strategy game without pausing. Usually, you’re building structures and armies to wipe out your competing players before they can di it to you. 

SIM

Simulation. This is a game that directly reflects (usually) real life. So in Farming SIMs you plant crops and make money to build a tractor or increase your plot (Stardew Valley is a great one) and you’re basically…farming. But virtually. There are Flight Simulators, Job Simulators, Zoo Simulators… anything you can imagine almost!  

 

Gamer Lingo You May See in the Chat

And now for a list of lingo you’re likely to see in the chat at some point. This is by no means comprehensive and we do not list anything profane or derogatory. Because you don’t need to learn that because you’re not gonna be a troll (mean internet person who starts fights or says horrible things for no discernable reason), right? RIGHT?!?!?

Cheese

Underhanded strategy – not quite cheating. Often used as a verb.

 

“She’s cheesing her way to winning.”

DC

DC = Disconnect. Sometimes, players will disconnect then reconnect. Often not their fault, but annoying because it can affect the gameplay.

 

“Sorry! I dced. Think the cat knocked over my router.”

 

EZ

Shorthand for “easy.” Usually, this is used in a derogatory way to indicate that a player had an “easy” time because their competitor was lame. 

 

“GG ez.”  (see below for definition of “gg”)

 

Feeder / Feeding / Fed

A player or character who dies repeatedly in a way that helps the other team – intentionally or accidentally. A player who benefits from a feeder is the “fed”.

 

“Why is Lydia such a freaking feeder? She keeps alerting the Dragur to my presence before I can sneak up on them!”

 

FF

Friendly Fire or Forfeit. Friendly Fire means you’re shot by a teammate (or you shoot your teammate – whoops!) and it causes damage. If it gets really bad, your teammates may drop the FF (as in forfeit) so they can end the game. 

 

“You shot me again?! Quit with the FF, man!”

 

“We’re never gonna win now, let’s FF.”

 

FTW

Meaning “for the win”, this phrase usually comes at the end of a comment after something happens that causes a win for the team or the character – like when a teammate slides in and kills a dragon for you right before you get eaten. 

 

“Nice! Beagles98 FTW!” 

 

Warning! This can be (and is) used ironically. A lot. 

 

Griefer

Someone (not you, right?) who harasses other players specifically to mess them up or ruin the game for them. Aka a giant jerk. 

 

“Can you ban this griefer? He keeps riding by and shooting me when I’m farming.”

 

GG / BG

“Good Game” / “Bad Game.” Like in Little League when you slapped the other team’s hands at the end of the game and said “good game” over and over before pizza. People with good sportsmanship usually say GG even when they lose. Sore losers sometimes say BG. 

 

“GG everyone! I’m out!”

 

GG no re

“Good Game, no replay.” When you want to say “good game!” but you don’t want to play again or fight the same person again. Said as one phrase usually.

 

“GG no re”

Hacks / Hackz / Hax

Hacking – otherwise known as cheating. If some dude at Level 1 is landing headshots every time, they’re either very, very good or very, very hacking. 

 

“That noob just killed me with one arrow! Hax!”

 

HF

“Have Fun.” Used just like you would in real life – only shorter. 

 

“HF everyone! Let’s play!”

 

IGN

“In-Game Name.” Your self-identification in the game! Your user name basically. Gamers take this seriously. Some people use the same name everywhere and some customize depending on the game. But everyone agrees – don’t be that guy who picks their name and then adds a string of numbers to the end. That’s lazy. And hard to remember. (Looking at you Mike18745255789)

 

“Wanna play WoW tonight? What’s your ign?”

 

INC

“Incoming.” Used as a warning. Like saying “Head’s Up!”

“Inc! Orcs I think.”

 

LEET / 1337

Short for “elite.” Also, an alternative alphabet that’s all numbers known as “leetspeak” Supposedly because a lot of elite gamers use it and it’s hard. Oft used as an adjective. 

 

“This sword is leet.”

 

LFG / LFM / LFP

“Looking for Group / More / Party.” 

Used by people who are looking to build a group or party – in fantasy games usually because people are trying to run a dungeon or a raid that requires multiple players. Some people add numbers to indicate how many they need. 

 

“LFG Enchanted Forest”

 

“LF3M Cleric’s Peril”

 

Noob / n00b / newb

Someone who is new and (usually) performing poorly as they learn the game. Sometimes used as a snide insult to an experienced player who messes up. 

 

“You’re literally standing in the fire, you noob.”

 

OHKO

“One-Hit Knock-Out.” A single attack that kills an opponent in one hit. 

 

“Controls suck, but Jigglypuff’s pound is OHKO city, man!”

 

OOM / OOR

“Out of Mana / Resource.” When you’re out of mana (magic power) or whatever resource you need to fight. It’s much faster to type during a difficult boss fight and let’s other players know to cover you until you power back up.

 

“Sorry, OOM!”

 

OP / Imba

“Over Powered” / “Imbalanced.” Used when characters or items in games are too strong and throw the balance of the game off. 

 

“Wolverine is so OP, it makes the game boring”

 

OTW

“On the Way.” You know what this means.

 

“OTW, wait please!”

PK

“Player Kill.” When you kill someone else’s character. 

 

“Wanna go PK some noobs?”

 

PUG

“Pick-Up Group.” A group of players (usually strangers) that banded together randomly to complete a quest. 

 

“I hate PUGs. Half of them don’t know how to play!”

 

QQ

Instead of using the crying emoji, you use QQ. Supposedly the O part looks like eyes, and the tail of the Q looks like tears. 

 

“Stop QQing and just blast him already!”

 

Rekt / Owned / Pwned

“Wrecked.” Most often used after a clearly one-sided battle. Can also be used when you badly outplay another player.

 

“Just got rekt by that noob. Shook.”

 

Rez

“Resurrect.” Usually said as a request – like if the healer doesn’t know you’re bleeding out because he’s fighting or distracted. 

 

“Rez anyone… plz?”

 

Salty

“Upset” or “bitter.” People can get salty when they die over and over, when someone starts spamming them, or when a silly mistake has big consequences. Happens to everyone! Just don’t let saltiness become toxic behavior. 

 

“You still salty about that fight? It was last week!”

 

Smurf

When an experienced player makes a new character or account specifically to play against low-level players and win. 

 

“Why’re you smurfing in WoW? We have guild quests to do man.”

 

Toxic

Pretty self-explanatory. A person who is behaving badly and ruining other people’s fun. I.e. Complaining, cursing, breaking character to tick people off, etc. 

 

“Stop being so toxic. You’re gonna get banned, man.”

 

WTB / WTT / WTS

“Wants to Buy / Trade / Sell.” Usually followed by the item for sale or trade. Used in trade chats. 

 

“[WTB] 10 x Silver Ingots.”

 

“[WTT] helmet for shield.”

 

Xpac

 

“Expansion Pack.” A package of new content released by the game makers as an expansion for the game. Usually costs extra money.  

 

“You got the new xpac yet? Digging this new wizard staff”

 

This is hardly an all-inclusive glossary of gamer lingo, but it’s an excellent place to start when you’re noob-ing it up in your new game of choice! 

If you ever want to talk gamer lingo or games in general, hit up the Game Goblins staff! We live for this stuff! We’re always here to answer your questions and help you get started in any area of gaming.

There’s a reason certain games have withstood the test of time. Card games like Magic: The Gathering have been popular for decades because they offer more than gameplay. They offer an entire currency.

Trading cards in these games can help you build your dream deck, making every game that much more fun. If you’re a beginner, keep these tips in mind as you embark on your first trades.

 

Stay Local

No matter where you are, you’ll be able to find a local community of people interested in gaming and trading. We can attest that in Little Rock, that community is alive and well.

Whenever possible, trade with those in your local community rather than trading with unknown people you encounter online.

Trades are negotiations, and you need to be careful to ensure that you’re getting a fair deal and that you’re trading with a trustworthy person. It’s far easier for someone to deceive you behind a computer screen than in person.

 

Do Your Homework…and Keep Doing It

As with any negotiation, your best weapon while trading cards is your knowledge.

The value of the cards in your game of choice will shift over time, and those changes can happen quickly. If you haven’t keep up with the latest trends, you could be making poor trades because you don’t realize how your cards’ values have changed.

Find a few reliable resources and follow up with them on a regular basis to make sure you stay informed.

 

Build a Community

As we mentioned, Little Rock has a thriving gaming community. Get involved in that community and form a bond with us.

By building a relationship with other locals, you’ll have the insider knowledge about trading cards. You can make connections that could turn into great trades. You’ll also be able to learn more about your game of choice and get tips from seasoned experts.

The easiest way to do this is to start attending events at gaming stores that specialize in trading card games.

 

Know Your Schedule

Some games, particularly Magic: The Gathering, release new cards on a regular schedule. Every new release has the potential to change your cards’ values and even change the game in a major way.

No matter which games you enjoy, become an avid follower. Stay up-to-date on the release schedules.

Experts often make predictions about how you can expect your card values to change before those new releases happen, so read up on those insights as well.

 

Get Organized

One of the biggest challenges with trading cards is keeping tabs on what you have at different times. If you tend to trade cards often, it’s especially challenging to keep it all straight.

This is where technology comes in. Use trading card apps to organize your cards and keep track of them all. Many of these apps also let you record your trades so you know who you’ve traded with and when.

Of course, it’s crucial to protect your cards as well. While the apps can help you see everything at a glance, an inexpensive binder made for cards will keep your cards in order, available, and in great condition.

 

Start Trading Cards Like a Pro

Without a doubt, the easiest way to learn about trading cards is to pick up tips from the pros. In addition to the tips above, start by visiting Game Goblins for any of our upcoming gaming events.

There’s a reason certain games have withstood the test of time. Card games like Magic: The Gathering have been popular for decades because they offer more than gameplay. They offer an entire currency.

Trading cards in these games can help you build your dream deck, making every game that much more fun. If you’re a beginner, keep these tips in mind as you embark on your first trades.

 

Stay Local

No matter where you are, you’ll be able to find a local community of people interested in gaming and trading. We can attest that in Little Rock, that community is alive and well.

Whenever possible, trade with those in your local community rather than trading with unknown people you encounter online.

Trades are negotiations, and you need to be careful to ensure that you’re getting a fair deal and that you’re trading with a trustworthy person. It’s far easier for someone to deceive you behind a computer screen than in person.

 

Do Your Homework…and Keep Doing It

As with any negotiation, your best weapon while trading cards is your knowledge.

The value of the cards in your game of choice will shift over time, and those changes can happen quickly. If you haven’t keep up with the latest trends, you could be making poor trades because you don’t realize how your cards’ values have changed.

Find a few reliable resources and follow up with them on a regular basis to make sure you stay informed.

 

Build a Community

As we mentioned, Little Rock has a thriving gaming community. Get involved in that community and form a bond with us.

By building a relationship with other locals, you’ll have the insider knowledge about trading cards. You can make connections that could turn into great trades. You’ll also be able to learn more about your game of choice and get tips from seasoned experts.

The easiest way to do this is to start attending events at gaming stores that specialize in trading card games.

 

Know Your Schedule

Some games, particularly Magic: The Gathering, release new cards on a regular schedule. Every new release has the potential to change your cards’ values and even change the game in a major way.

No matter which games you enjoy, become an avid follower. Stay up-to-date on the release schedules.

Experts often make predictions about how you can expect your card values to change before those new releases happen, so read up on those insights as well.

 

Get Organized

One of the biggest challenges with trading cards is keeping tabs on what you have at different times. If you tend to trade cards often, it’s especially challenging to keep it all straight.

This is where technology comes in. Use trading card apps to organize your cards and keep track of them all. Many of these apps also let you record your trades so you know who you’ve traded with and when.

Of course, it’s crucial to protect your cards as well. While the apps can help you see everything at a glance, an inexpensive binder made for cards will keep your cards in order, available, and in great condition.

 

Start Trading Cards Like a Pro

Without a doubt, the easiest way to learn about trading cards is to pick up tips from the pros. In addition to the tips above, start by visiting Game Goblins for any of our upcoming gaming events.

There’s a reason certain games have withstood the test of time. Card games like Magic: The Gathering have been popular for decades because they offer more than gameplay. They offer an entire currency.

Trading cards in these games can help you build your dream deck, making every game that much more fun. If you’re a beginner, keep these tips in mind as you embark on your first trades.

 

Stay Local

No matter where you are, you’ll be able to find a local community of people interested in gaming and trading. We can attest that in Little Rock, that community is alive and well.

Whenever possible, trade with those in your local community rather than trading with unknown people you encounter online.

Trades are negotiations, and you need to be careful to ensure that you’re getting a fair deal and that you’re trading with a trustworthy person. It’s far easier for someone to deceive you behind a computer screen than in person.

 

Do Your Homework…and Keep Doing It

As with any negotiation, your best weapon while trading cards is your knowledge.

The value of the cards in your game of choice will shift over time, and those changes can happen quickly. If you haven’t keep up with the latest trends, you could be making poor trades because you don’t realize how your cards’ values have changed.

Find a few reliable resources and follow up with them on a regular basis to make sure you stay informed.

 

Build a Community

As we mentioned, Little Rock has a thriving gaming community. Get involved in that community and form a bond with us.

By building a relationship with other locals, you’ll have the insider knowledge about trading cards. You can make connections that could turn into great trades. You’ll also be able to learn more about your game of choice and get tips from seasoned experts.

The easiest way to do this is to start attending events at gaming stores that specialize in trading card games.

 

Know Your Schedule

Some games, particularly Magic: The Gathering, release new cards on a regular schedule. Every new release has the potential to change your cards’ values and even change the game in a major way.

No matter which games you enjoy, become an avid follower. Stay up-to-date on the release schedules.

Experts often make predictions about how you can expect your card values to change before those new releases happen, so read up on those insights as well.

 

Get Organized

One of the biggest challenges with trading cards is keeping tabs on what you have at different times. If you tend to trade cards often, it’s especially challenging to keep it all straight.

This is where technology comes in. Use trading card apps to organize your cards and keep track of them all. Many of these apps also let you record your trades so you know who you’ve traded with and when.

Of course, it’s crucial to protect your cards as well. While the apps can help you see everything at a glance, an inexpensive binder made for cards will keep your cards in order, available, and in great condition.

 

Start Trading Cards Like a Pro

Without a doubt, the easiest way to learn about trading cards is to pick up tips from the pros. In addition to the tips above, start by visiting Game Goblins for any of our upcoming gaming events.

There’s a reason certain games have withstood the test of time. Card games like Magic: The Gathering have been popular for decades because they offer more than gameplay. They offer an entire currency.

Trading cards in these games can help you build your dream deck, making every game that much more fun. If you’re a beginner, keep these tips in mind as you embark on your first trades.

 

Stay Local

No matter where you are, you’ll be able to find a local community of people interested in gaming and trading. We can attest that in Little Rock, that community is alive and well.

Whenever possible, trade with those in your local community rather than trading with unknown people you encounter online.

Trades are negotiations, and you need to be careful to ensure that you’re getting a fair deal and that you’re trading with a trustworthy person. It’s far easier for someone to deceive you behind a computer screen than in person.

 

Do Your Homework…and Keep Doing It

As with any negotiation, your best weapon while trading cards is your knowledge.

The value of the cards in your game of choice will shift over time, and those changes can happen quickly. If you haven’t keep up with the latest trends, you could be making poor trades because you don’t realize how your cards’ values have changed.

Find a few reliable resources and follow up with them on a regular basis to make sure you stay informed.

 

Build a Community

As we mentioned, Little Rock has a thriving gaming community. Get involved in that community and form a bond with us.

By building a relationship with other locals, you’ll have the insider knowledge about trading cards. You can make connections that could turn into great trades. You’ll also be able to learn more about your game of choice and get tips from seasoned experts.

The easiest way to do this is to start attending events at gaming stores that specialize in trading card games.

 

Know Your Schedule

Some games, particularly Magic: The Gathering, release new cards on a regular schedule. Every new release has the potential to change your cards’ values and even change the game in a major way.

No matter which games you enjoy, become an avid follower. Stay up-to-date on the release schedules.

Experts often make predictions about how you can expect your card values to change before those new releases happen, so read up on those insights as well.

 

Get Organized

One of the biggest challenges with trading cards is keeping tabs on what you have at different times. If you tend to trade cards often, it’s especially challenging to keep it all straight.

This is where technology comes in. Use trading card apps to organize your cards and keep track of them all. Many of these apps also let you record your trades so you know who you’ve traded with and when.

Of course, it’s crucial to protect your cards as well. While the apps can help you see everything at a glance, an inexpensive binder made for cards will keep your cards in order, available, and in great condition.

 

Start Trading Cards Like a Pro

Without a doubt, the easiest way to learn about trading cards is to pick up tips from the pros. In addition to the tips above, start by visiting Game Goblins for any of our upcoming gaming events.

There’s a reason certain games have withstood the test of time. Card games like Magic: The Gathering have been popular for decades because they offer more than gameplay. They offer an entire currency.

Trading cards in these games can help you build your dream deck, making every game that much more fun. If you’re a beginner, keep these tips in mind as you embark on your first trades.

 

Stay Local

No matter where you are, you’ll be able to find a local community of people interested in gaming and trading. We can attest that in Little Rock, that community is alive and well.

Whenever possible, trade with those in your local community rather than trading with unknown people you encounter online.

Trades are negotiations, and you need to be careful to ensure that you’re getting a fair deal and that you’re trading with a trustworthy person. It’s far easier for someone to deceive you behind a computer screen than in person.

 

Do Your Homework…and Keep Doing It

As with any negotiation, your best weapon while trading cards is your knowledge.

The value of the cards in your game of choice will shift over time, and those changes can happen quickly. If you haven’t keep up with the latest trends, you could be making poor trades because you don’t realize how your cards’ values have changed.

Find a few reliable resources and follow up with them on a regular basis to make sure you stay informed.

 

Build a Community

As we mentioned, Little Rock has a thriving gaming community. Get involved in that community and form a bond with us.

By building a relationship with other locals, you’ll have the insider knowledge about trading cards. You can make connections that could turn into great trades. You’ll also be able to learn more about your game of choice and get tips from seasoned experts.

The easiest way to do this is to start attending events at gaming stores that specialize in trading card games.

 

Know Your Schedule

Some games, particularly Magic: The Gathering, release new cards on a regular schedule. Every new release has the potential to change your cards’ values and even change the game in a major way.

No matter which games you enjoy, become an avid follower. Stay up-to-date on the release schedules.

Experts often make predictions about how you can expect your card values to change before those new releases happen, so read up on those insights as well.

 

Get Organized

One of the biggest challenges with trading cards is keeping tabs on what you have at different times. If you tend to trade cards often, it’s especially challenging to keep it all straight.

This is where technology comes in. Use trading card apps to organize your cards and keep track of them all. Many of these apps also let you record your trades so you know who you’ve traded with and when.

Of course, it’s crucial to protect your cards as well. While the apps can help you see everything at a glance, an inexpensive binder made for cards will keep your cards in order, available, and in great condition.

 

Start Trading Cards Like a Pro

Without a doubt, the easiest way to learn about trading cards is to pick up tips from the pros. In addition to the tips above, start by visiting Game Goblins for any of our upcoming gaming events.